It’s time to stop with the ‘bicycle highways’

I finally found a true Dutch bike in North America. Here’s what you need to know

Why ‘bike culture’ isn’t as important as bike infrastructure

Five easy ways to reduce bike theft in your community

Help redesign this street so it’s better for all users

A bike exploration exposing why stroads are so bad in North American cities

There’s a route in my city that I’ve hated for years. It’s bad to drive on. It’s bad to ride a bike on. It’s bad to walk on. But I never could really put my finger on why it was so loathsome until I read the new ¬†@Strong Towns¬† book Confessions of a Recovering Engineer: Transportation for a Strong Town by Chuck Marohn. Now I know why: This route is a stroad. So I decided to go a bicycle adventure all along the worst stroad in my city to really get to the heart of its awfulness.

Five ways cities fail in accommodating winter cycling

A few weeks ago, I made a video about mistakes that newbie winter cyclists make. But the things we can do individually is only part of the equation. Of even more importance to winter cycling is the things our cities can do to make winter cycling work. Unfortunately, cities don’t always get it right. So after exploring winter cycling for years, here are some of the mistakes that I’ve seen cities make.

Eight mistakes new winter bike commuters make and how to avoid them

Riding a bike through winter can be a challenge, but there’s no need to miss out on the pleasures and benefits of riding in winter. So, after doing it badly for years, I’ve compiled a list of mistakes that I (and some other people) have made over the years with the hopes of helping you avoid these rookie missteps.

Should you listen to music while riding a bike?

A viewer emailed recently with a question I had long pondered but never actioned: Is listening to music on a bike a good thing? If so, how? I have never worn headphones while riding, always assuming that it was terribly unsafe to plug your ears while riding city streets, so I had no answer. So in this video, I set out to answer the question.

Disconnected bike routes aren’t just annoying. They’re ruining our transportation potential

If your city is like mine, there have been many initiatives over the years to improve its bike-friendliness, from painted bike lanes to pathways to separated bike lanes. But if you’re city is really like mine then many of those routes remain islands unto themselves, disconnected from each other and untethered to a more comprehensive plan intended to help cyclists really get around the city. So after exploring these disconnections, I have a theory that there are four different types of disconnections that can be easily fixed to make our cities more bike-friendly.

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